Senior citizen Jordan Smith loses his wife to cancer. Devastated and angry, he hunts down the HMO executive who denied their medical claims, but then progresses from revenge to political assassination. Michael Demidov and Simone Fitzhugh, the county detectives assigned to the initial murder, are hard pressed to keep up with the enterprising Mr. Smith. Then Smith’s latest job causes a massive and hilarious political furor in Washington. Predictably, the FBI hijacks the case from the county detectives, but mutual blackmail provides an unexpected resolution.

After being abducted and raped, Sandra Neuermann plunges into deep depression until a therapist prescribes the right cure for her: revenge!

He points her toward Nemesis, a secret organization that provides justice to violated women by hunting down the men who have raped them. The organization’s hunters are called Furies, and they also pursue sex traffickers with equal vigor and efficiency.

The overwhelming majority of rapists go free for many reasons, but they do not escape the Furies of Nemesis, and they especially do not escape Sandra Neuermann.

In the course of events (and in spite of herself), Neuermann finds herself attracted to Daniel Berrien, an elementary school teacher. Berrien’s gentle and patient pursuit wears down her ingrained resistance, but how can the ace Fury possibly maintain her balance with a foot in two such disparate worlds? And how can Nemesis continue to operate without drawing unwelcome attention from the authorities?

“In Elder’s thriller…the ending may shock more than a few readers, but it definitely packs a dramatic punch…an assassin story that delivers action while shrewdly examining the consequences.”  —Kirkus ReviewsType your paragraph here.

Stephen Elder

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Detectives Fitzhugh and Demidov return to discover a series of seemingly unrelated deaths that look like heart attacks but are found to be murders. They help the FBI unravel a tangled web of illegal drugs, a gunrunning militia, and a sinister terrorist plot to bring down the US government, all hatched by a shadowy figure called The Spider. The detectives’ lives are further complicated when Demidov’s Russian mafia family tries to draw the estranged son back into the fold. With Simone’s help, Demidov manages to extricate himself from the clutches of his family, but the consequences prove to be both a great boon and a heavy burden.  

 "Ye Gods!" 1. exclamation of surprise 2. collection of short stories ranging from dark whimsy to scathing satire. Warning: this collection contains occasional wry humor, biting political commentary, social criticism, and dire prognostication. Side effects include but are not limited to: laughter, head shaking, and 3 AM epiphanies. Occasional tears have been reported. Characters are taken from various pantheons (Zeus, Shiva), classical literature/mythology (Icarus), history (Custer), and real life (Bigfoot, space aliens). This collection is intended to relieve the symptoms of boredom and ennui. It may be taken straight or with a grain of salt. Store in brightly lit areas such as beside a comfortable chair or on a bedside table.


The Shining Man and his wife return on another mission. When Filiae Mundi, a wealthy but secretive organization, nominates Elaine to its governing Council, Frank and Elaine go to Washington, a nexus of power and multi-layered danger. Elaine proposes an initiative to put more women into elective office in an effort to fix the dysfunctional Congress.  If successful, her plan may save the world, but it could mean exposing Frank as well as the organization itself to unwanted public attention. Frank manages to maintain his ongoing ministry to the animal world, but an unexpected turn of events taxes his powers to their limit.

The narrator of The Edenite Case is Ellit2, a Ceph detective in the Galactic Union's Division 51. Cephs are loners by temperament. When Ellit2 is assigned a partner, a human no less, the Ceph is very unhappy. The two detectives gradually reach a working accord that becomes deep respect and affection.

Ellit2 and Rae Maxxon are tasked with investigating atrocities committed by one group of humans (militant Edenites) against another (non-militant Edenites). They travel to several worlds where they are forced to be both diplomats and warriors. They also have to navigate emerging intrigues within the Galactic Council. With the help of a talented crew of several species, the two detectives manage to solve the case and avoid entrapment in the Council intrigue.

 

The second Saint Francis novel. At the the end of Frank, Saint Francis is released from his emissary duty to marry Elaine Azerian, a small-town veterinarian. In The Shining Man's Wife, the saint and his wife are sent west on a mission to save a bison herd. Their dramatic rescue of the animals attracts the attention of a secretive organization called Filae Mundi. They are summoned to the Daughters of the world's headquarters to help with an environmental problem, and the ensuing chain of events threatens to expose Frank's real identity.

Stephen Elder’s latest collection has something for everyone. There are stories about creatures that share our world (often more intimately than we would like), an explanation of football for the sports-challenged, and deliciously satiric poetry.

As the charming title suggests, there are also stories about angels (not all of Santa’s gifts are under the tree), love in its various manifestations (even transspecies), and a story about that familiar figure, the crow.

 There is proof that not all monsters are bad (“The Monster that Lived Under the Bed”), and that writers struggle (“IChat with a Muse”).

Love and angels notwithstanding, there is also some pointed commentary on the human race (“A Drone Visits Alice”)

A look at life through the eyes of Grift and Graft, corvine students of mankind. The Crow Chronicles describes how two crows move from the open countryside into town. The two friends have to adjust to a lot of things, such as traffic, pizza, and several raccoons who have already made the transition to city life.

Their biggest adjustment is to humans. Grift and Graft even learn to read in order to better study the twoleggers. Along the way, the crows make several new friends, but things do not turn out at all like they imagined.

This humorous exploration of the similarities between humans and animals is aimed at older children, but adults will also enjoy it.

 

The second collection offers penetrating analyses of ancient and modern history (“Stone Age Tax Time” and “Lewis Books a Trip"), plus pioneering essays on zoology (“The Ant Olympics” and “Interview with I’ll Have Another”). The author offers further enlightenment by explaining how appliances are sometimes possessed by unfriendly spirits. As a bonus, an excellent dragon recipe for knight stew is included. The “Life” section examines the consumer finance industry, child abduction, and the return of the Tooth Fairy. Despite the author’s best efforts, the “Death” section turns serious in “Saved” and “He finally Stopped Loving Her.”

Ye Gods!2 includes three novelettes, The Writing Spider,Toby and Dervish, and Relatives. The novelettes are also available separately as Kindle Singles on Amazon.

A story about Saint Francis in the modern world. His mission takes him to a small North Carolina town, but his past has not prepared him for the involvements he finds there. Departure seems to be the only way out, but the people whose lives he has touched vow not to let that happen, and "Frank" is caught in the middle.

  "...written with all the milk and honey of a good Hallmark special." Foreword Reviews

Little Book of Essays is a collection of Stephen Elder’s humorous yet pointed commentary. Elder, a former teacher of historical linguistics, has plenty to say about the sad state of modern English usage. His dismay spills over into the political sphere, where both D’s and R’s receive unloving scrutiny.

There are also rare glimpses into the author's personal life


Finally, some scathe falls upon the genpop itself.


This is the revised and expanded edition of 2016. Readers will be pleased to discover that, amazingly, the print format of Little Book of Essays permits enjoyment independent of cellphone coverage, Wi-fi availability, or expensive electronic equipment.

Enginewitch is a diatribe masked as a sci-fi novel. It is based on current events that add new fodder daily (and much faster than can be digested). The Enginewitch is Shiloh Alderman,  a young woman who can control electricity with her mind. She is recruited into the CIA, where she is drawn into a daring plot.

The president's total lack of government experience, clueless foreign policy, incessant lying, disregard for law, ad delusional tweets have marked him as America's greatest security risk according to an analysis conducted by the intelligence agencies. Their study concludes that America will soon be either at war with China, or embroiled in a civil war. An act without precedent is called for.

Enter the Enginewitch, who faces a terrible conflict between patriotism and personal belief. Her decisiion can save or doom the country.